Is This 1,000-Year-Old Rock Art The Earliest Picture Of A Total Eclipse?

Rock carvings, or petroglyphs, found in a canyon in New Mexico appear to illustrate an overall eclipse that took place over 1,000 years earlier.

Experts from the University of Colorado, Boulder, state the ancient art, sculpted onto the face of a rock in Chaco Canyon by the early Pueblo individuals, might portray the overall solar eclipse that took place on July 11, 1097 CE.

They recommend the carvings reveal the Sun’ s corona– the outer part of the Sun’s environment that is most quickly seen throughout an overall solar eclipse — as illustrated by a circle with swirls coming out of it.

“ To me it appears like a circular function with curved tangles and structures, ” stated J McKim Malville of CU Boulder ’ s planetary and astrophysical sciences department, who led the sightseeing tour to the canyon that initially found the petroglyphs in 1992. He released a paper on them in 2014.

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“ If one takes a look at an illustration by a German astronomer of the 1860 overall solar eclipse throughout high solar activity, loops and rays just like those illustrated in the Chaco petroglyph show up.”

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German astronomer Tempel’s illustration of the overall eclipse on July 18, 1860.

The carvings, which appear on a freestanding rock called Piedra del Sol , likewise reveal exactly what they believe may be a coronal mass ejection,

which is practical based upon information of the Sun ’ s activity from that time.

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To evaluate this, Malville and his group studied tree rings which contain traces of isotope carbon-14, which is produced when cosmic rays struck Earth ’ s environment. The less carbon-14 they discovered, the more sunspots, which suggests increased Sun activity.

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They likewise utilized historic information taped by Europeans who made observations about when the northern lights showed up, another indication of high solar activity. They looked at observations taped in China that go back thousands of years on sunspots observed by the naked eye.

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All revealed there was solar activity at the time the art is dated to.

 content-1502362146-eclipse-2. jpg The possible petroglyph of an overall solar eclipse, inning accordance with the scientists. University of Colorado Boulder

The Piedra del Sol likewise reveals exactly what seems a big spiral, implied to illustrate the Sun, marking the 15 daybreaks counting down to the summertime solstice by a triangular shadow probably from a rock that crosses the Sun. There are likewise markings on the rock that compare with the Sun on the horizon throughout the December solstice.

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“ I believe it is rather possible that the Chacoan individuals might have gathered around Piedradel Sol at particular times of the year and were viewing the sun move far from the summertime solstice when the eclipse took place, ” Malville stated, recommending their focus had really been on the solstice, not the eclipse.

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Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/is-this-1000yearold-rock-art-the-earliest-picture-of-a-total-eclipse/